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CARING FOR THE CHINESE. NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME XLVI, ISSUE 14141, 17 AUGUST 1909, PAGE 6 https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19090817.2.75

CARING FOR THE CHINESE.[1]

CLUB IN WELLINGTON.

WHAT A REPORTER SAW.

[BY TELEGRAPH. OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
Wellington, Monday,

house of eight or 10 rooms, with almost nothing to distinguish it externally from those which flank it on the north side of Ghuznee-street, forms the headquarters of the newly-formed Chinese Club. A Wellington pressman, who called there on Saturday afternoon, was not sure that he had found the place, until he saw affixed to the woodwork beside the door a small white card bearing the printed words: "Chinese Association of Wellington." Then he pushed the electric button, and a well-dressed, pleasant, smiling Chinaman promptly opened the door. This was Mr. Gan Charm, the secretary, and after a brief explanation he led the way to the reading-room. A large table was the chief article of furniture, and upon this were placed, with perfect rectangular neatness, a large number of newspapers in Chinese, and one in English. The Chinese papers came from presses in Sydney, Melbourne, and San Francisco, as well as Shanghai, Hongkong and other places in China. By-the-bye, it was gathered that the Chinese hope to publish a paper of their own in Wellington. Mr. Gan Charm explained that £700 had been subscribed towards the funds of the association. Excepting the Chinese papers, inscriptions, and one wall picture in the transparent Oriental colouring, there is nothing to mark the reading room as different from hundreds of other reading-rooms in New Zealand. The pressman was also shown the reception room, which was softly carpeted, and furnished with satin upholstered chairs and couches, all quite European. Upstairs are a large classroom, a small smoking-room, a writing-room, and the secretary's office, A blackboard in the classroom is covered with Chinese writing, and inkpots and pens are arranged on the table with Chinese precision. Twenty-five or 30 young men come there twice a week to learn English and other things, says Mr. Gan Charm. Mr. Hwang, the Chinese Consul, is the principal teacher at present, but his private secretary and other Chinese residents assist, and a Chinese Christian missionary gives religious teaching. The clubhouse may be used by any of the Chinese, and at any hour of the day.

"It is a very small beginning," said the Chinese Consul. "We are going to start a small library of Chinese books on modern questions. The rooms are open to all Chinese, and it is a place where they can hold meetings. We have a committee to manage it, I simply act as leader for the present, but by-and-bye I shall ask somebody else to take the position."


  1. CARING FOR THE CHINESE. NEW ZEALAND HERALD, VOLUME XLVI, ISSUE 14141, 17 AUGUST 1909, PAGE 6 https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19090817.2.75

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